Referendum - Aktualne.PrahaNaDlani.cz http://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/c1/referendum.html cs Copyright 2018, Aktualne.PrahaNaDlani.cz. All Rights Reserved. Wed, 20 Jun 2018 18:49:41 -1000 Wed, 20 Jun 2018 18:49:41 -1000 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss PrahaNaDlani.cz - AktualneReferendum RSS kanál - Poslední zprávy - poslední články, zprávy a aktuality s tématem Referendum. Aktuální zpravodajství vždy na serveru Aktualne.PrahaNaDlani.cz Aktualne.PrahaNaDlani.cz - Prehled zpravodajstvi http://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/img/aktualne-prahanadlani-rss.png http://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/c1/referendum.html May wins 'meaningful vote' victory after lead rebel Grieve accepts compromise - as it happenedhttp://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/referendum/1261734-may-wins-meaningful-vote-victory-after-lead-rebel-grieve-accepts-compromise-as-it-happened.html

Follow live updates for PMQs, health secretary statement and Theresa May’s final push to head off a ‘meaningful vote’ rebellion on Brexit

We’re going to close our live coverage for the evening. Thanks for reading. Here’s a recap of the afternoon summary put together by my colleague, Jessica Elgot:

We’ve managed to reach a compromise without breaking the government – and I think some people don’t realise we were getting quite close to that. I completely respect the view of my colleagues who disagree, but if we can compromise we can achieve more.

This is a disappointing result and comes after Theresa May is forced once again to try to buy off her own MPs at the eleventh hour.

Related: Brexit 'meaningful vote': May wins after rebels accept compromise

Sky News’ senior political correspondent, Beth Rigby, has this on the reaction from pro-Brexit Tory backbenchers:

This is what the head of the #ERG @Jacob_Rees_Mogg send to the Brexiteers' Whatsapp group following the #MeaningfulVote. "We now have the two laws needed in place to allow us to leave"... "govt stood firm" and remainers "behaved very decently" pic.twitter.com/kTCZFNd72r

The indications had been that Labour were bitterly disappointed to lose a vote they thought they had a good chance of winning when Dominic Grieve withdrew his support. The shadow Brexit secretary, Keir Starmer, is explicit:

Real disappointment. We could have won that vote. But this does not end here. We will take every opportunity to ensure that we get a fully meaningful vote on the Article 50 deal. https://t.co/QqsV7yNRxT

A Labour source said they expected no further “ping pong” between the Lords and the Commons when the bill returns to the upper house tonight. They expect proceedings to be wrapped up by 8pm, probably without a vote.

The Lords *will* consider the EU Withdrawal bill again tonight, but by convention they are unlikely to send it back to the Commons again.

It will mean the bill has passed its final hurdle before receiving Royal Assent.

#EUWithdrawalBill returns to #HouseofLords at 7.30, see more https://t.co/4VcXYMh0VI pic.twitter.com/wVMTE4LuQP

We’ve managed to reach a compromise without breaking the government – and I think some people don’t realise we were getting quite close to that. I completely respect the view of my colleagues who disagree, but if we can compromise we can achieve more.

This is a disappointing result and comes after Theresa May is forced once again to try to buy off her own MPs at the eleventh hour.

There was some quite heavy briefing this morning that Labour Eurosceptics and Labour MPs with leave-leaning seats could be the ones to deliver the government victory tonight, by rebelling against their party and voting against the amendment.

Labour whips say they are pleased tonight that only four Labour MPs did so, all of them long-standing Brexiters. I’m told Denis Skinner, a fervent Eurosceptic but a long-standing friend and ally of Jeremy Corbyn, helped carry many waverers over the line.

There were some unedifying scenes in the Commons today as some sick and some heavily pregnant MPs had to go through the lobbies. My colleague Peter Walker has these details.

One of the effects of both the vote and the decision of the government to not allow MPs’ votes to be counted merely by their presence in parliament saw curious scenes in the corridor adjoining the lobby outside the Commons.

Naz Shah is wheeled out of the chamber after voting. Usual convention re sick MPs being ''nodded through'' has been scrapped today, and it's really not a good look. pic.twitter.com/ZSfAATPKrd

the MP spotted by @elliotttimes being helped out of car was Naz Shah, MP for Bradford West, who's been in hospital the last three days. She was meant to drop in for 10 minutes in the car park, but Tories are refusing to "nod through" her vote. She'll have to stay THREE HOURS...

The BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg says she thinks the government should be worried by how tight the vote was, even after the compromise was struck with Grieve.

Govt will be relieved to have avoided another defeat - but closeness after compromise suggests big problems ahead https://t.co/cj615tETZH

Trouble ahead for PM if Tory rebels vote for staying in customs union - ‘if’ https://t.co/6VjYa4fvWm

Labour’s shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer has reacted to the result. There is clearly a lot of frustration on the Labour benches that a win against the government was possible.

This is a disappointing result and comes after Theresa May is forced once again to try to buy off her own MPs at the eleventh hour.

Labour has long argued that Parliament should have a proper role in the Brexit negotiations and a meaningful vote on the terms upon which we leave the European Union. We will continue to make that argument and press our case at every opportunity.

Leading Tory Brexiter John Redwood said he was “very satisfied” with the result. “I never rashly doubted we would win, as otherwise it would frustrate the will of the British people,” he said.

Asked why the Tory rebels in both houses pushed the issue so long he said: “You’ll have to ask them. But I do think the Lords made a big mistake.”

It is a cruel irony that many of those making the amendments are of the generation of politicians who gave away so many powers to Brussels. And now it seems their main aim is to stop us from getting back those powers.

Dominic Grieve voted against his own amendment, but six Tories voted in favour, including Philip Lee, the former justice minister who resigned in protest of the government’s Brexit strategy.

The six rebels were:

Dominic Grieve has spoken to my colleague Peter Walker after the result of the vote. He says he believes reaching a compromise was the right solution, even if some of his allies disagreed.

We’ve managed to reach a compromise without breaking the government - and I think some people don’t realise we were getting quite close to that.

I completely respect the view of my colleagues who disagree, but if we can compromise we can achieve more.

The Lords amendment, drafted by Dominic Grieve, is defeated, after that last minute concession.

The government won by 16 votes - it will be interesting when we get the final stats about which Tory rebels rebelled, and which Labour MPs joined them.

Liberal Democrat Brexit spokesman Tom Brake has seized on the ‘Grand Old Duke of York’ nickname.

Just like the Grand Old Duke of York, Grieve has marched his troops to the top of the hill only to get cold feet and retreat with his tail between his legs.

Despite the clear calamity that May and Davis are making of Brexit, the so-called Tory rebels have lost their bottle and caved into yet another pathetic government compromise that isn’t worth the paper it is written on.

It seems like Labour MPs were forced to make it into Parliament from their sick beds, as was raised in the chamber in a point of order earlier. This from the Times’ Sam Coates.

I’ve just seen a Labour MP in a wheelchair with a paper sick bucket looking in lots of pain after voting (because Tories refused MPs who r ill to vote from the car park). It was quite a sad sight.

We expect the result in a few minutes. The government is now expected to win comfortably.

Just before the vote, the Labour MP George Howarth joked in the final speech in the Commons that Dominic Grieve is “in danger of becoming the Grand Old Duke of York.”

This from one of the Rebel Remainers explains the climb down from some but not all of them. It says that if there is no Brexit deal, government will inevitably face debate on an amendable motion - though not one that would bind May pic.twitter.com/xTcYuB2ij4

Anna Soubry is speaking now in the debate. She jokes she has a throat infection because the editor of the Daily Mail has a tiny doll in her image and is “sticking pins in its throat.”

She says she agrees with Antoinette Sandbach’s arguments, calling her “a remarkably brave woman.”

Tory veteran Ken Clarke, the most dogged of the Tory rebels, said that he is disappointed with the lack of time for debate and says it is obvious that the government wants to deny Parliament a say where it can, shown by the legal fight needed to get a vote on Article 50.

Clarke said he believed the government could be defeated. He jokes he was not invited to negotiations with the prime minister, “I don’t blame the chief whip for that... I think he knew I would take a rather strong line.”

Jacob Rees-Mogg is on his feet in the chamber now. He says the House still retains its constitutional power.

The powers and the authority and the rights of this House remain intact and that is not dependent on whether a meaningful vote is amendable or unamendable.

It sends the prime minister to the negotiating table, and the secretary of state, with a united House of Commons behind them.

Tory MP Antoinette Sandbach, a close ally of Grieve’s and one of the rebel MPs who voted against the government in December is speaking now. She has a quiver in her voice.

She says her constituents were under no illusions about her concerns about a meaningful vote on the final Brexit deal when they re-elected her.

Not to have a process in place should negotiations collapse would be irresponsible. And what is more, this amendment will ensure that when the PM sits down to negotiate, she does so with the full backing of parliament. Far from binding the prime minister, it strengthens her hand.

Theresa May has just arrived in the Commons. Reporters who are in the chamber says she is looking happy and relaxed. At the vote last week, she was hastily summoning rebels to her private Commons office to offer a compromise.

Here’s the snap reaction to Dominic Grieve’s concession from MPs and the commentariat.

This is the withering verdict from Labour MP Caroline Flint. Grieve is moving his amendment anyway to allow MPs to express their view, though he will not support it.

So if I understand it Dominic Grieve is asking the House to vote on his amendment which he’s not supporting.

So, the great confrontation--which would tell us if the Tory rebels have the numbers to defeat the govt--has been put off to another day again

2. It also postpones the day (again) when Theresa May faces down either wing of her party - as such it this will frustrate her internal critics again, one said, 'usual https://t.co/adR6kw8YFd from number 10'

So who blinked the most? A backbench motion in Govt time seems to be the key concession by ministers (which Grieve said he insisted on). The effect is Parliament v Govt stand-off postponed until endgame, rather than being resolved today.

Has Theresa May just put the future of Brexit in the hands of John Bercow? Govt says it will be Speaker's call if there is a row over whether MPs should be able to direct Govt on Brexit negotiations

Up to the Speaker but he is constrained by the standing orders which don’t give him the power to declare that a neutral motion is somehow not neutral #EUWithdrawalBill https://t.co/dIF9H59lIm

Grieve is now talking about the Davis compromise statement (see 1.53pm), which he says will be tabled as written ministerial statement tomorrow.

He says this confirms that it will be up to the speaker to decide whether a motion can be amended.

Dominic Grieve, the Conservative former attorney general, is speaking now.

He says he he wants to say “how deeply I object to the way [the House of Lords] get vilified for doing the job we have asked them to do”.

Starmer says the Lords amendment would ensure that, if the Commons voted down the withdrawal agreement, there would be order, not chaos.

He urges MPs to vote for it.

Labour’s Ruth Smeeth asks Starmer to confirm that it is Labour’s policy that the UK will leave the EU in March next year.

Starmer says that is Labour’s position.

Starmer says the government originally said MPs should not vote on the deal. They said that would tie the hands of the government. But eventually the government agreed to one, and the sky did not fall in.

This is not frustrating the Brexit process, he says. He says this is about ensuring there is a process.

Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit secretary, is speaking now.

He says the Lords amendment is not about blocking Brexit, or tying the hands of the government.

Labour’s Paul Farrelly raises a point of order. Referring to the Davis statement (see 1.53pm), he asks John Bercow what discretion he would have to rule that a motion could be amended if it were couched in neutral terms.

Bercow says he thinks this will be addressed in the debate.

Davis says you cannot enter a negotiation without the right to walk away.

So the Lords amendment would undermine the UK’s position in the negotiation, he says.

Sylvia Hermon, the independent MP for North Down, says she could not accept a no deal Brexit. That would lead to a hard border returning in Ireland.

Davis says the government will not accept the return of a hard border.

Davis is now talking about the “meaningful vote” amendment.

He says the government had three tests for such an amendment: it should not undermine the negotiations, it should not change the constitutional relationship between parliament and the executive, and it should accept the results of the referendum.

David Davis, the Brexit secretary, is opening the debate.

He says the government’s critics should not question its democratic credentials. He says parliament has been repeatedly involved in this process.

The debate is starting now.

John Bercow, the speaker, says he will call two amendments for a vote: Dominic Grieve’s one (see 11.24am) and one from the Lib Dem MP Tom Brake, saying the Commons “meaningful vote” could trigger another referendum on the final Brexit deal.

By lunchtime the gap between what the government was offering and what the rebels, led by Dominic Grieve, wanted was narrow. They both accept that, if MPs have not approved the Brexit withdrawal agreement by 21 January 2019, the government must schedule a vote within five working days. (See 11.24am.) But the government was saying that motion must be “in neutral terms, to the effect that the House of Commons has considered the matter of”. A motion like that would not be amendable. But Grieve and the rebels were not happy, because, in those circumstances, they wanted MPs to be able to table an amendment saying something like: “This House now requires the government to return to Brussels to try again/negotiate EEA membership/or whatever.”

The government has now issued a statement (see 1.53pm) saying that, actually, it will be up to the speaker at the time to decide if said motion debated under the terms of this clause can be amended.

1. Whether it is a climb down or a lawyer's way out - it massively reduces the chances of a rebellion later, and gives rebels and govt an escape route https://t.co/qWhewvX2DI

In the Commons Labour’s Ben Bradshaw has just asked a point of order about the Tories refusing to “nod through” sick MPs.

John Bercow, the speaker, says nodding through has been a long-established practice. But it is not matter for him.

This is from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssnberg.

Here’s the compromise or non-compromise pic.twitter.com/bLNJAJIZUM

John Prescott, the Labour former deputy prime minister, claims the government decision not to “nod through” sick MPs is unprecedented in his long experience.

In all my years in Parliament - even in the 1970s - I have NEVER seen this. This is absolutely bloody shameful.
I trust Labour MPs will be disgusted by these desperate and heartless Tory tactics, vote against the Government and back the meaningful vote. https://t.co/4OLNNUfttJ

Back to Gosport, and this is what the Crown Prosecution Service said following today’s report. A spokesman said”

We will consider the content of the report and will take any appropriate steps as required.

This is from Newsnight’s Nicholas Watt on the EU withdrawal bill.

Word last night was that compromise on meaningful vote would be: 1) Govt gesture: agree meaningful vote could be amendable. 2) Dominic Grieve gesture: that vote would have no legal force. 3) Compromise amendment would have to be tabled in lords. We’ll see

Back to the EU withdrawal bill, and more on Labour anger about the hardline approach of the Tory whips. These are from Sky’s Lewis Goodall.

Jeremy Corbyn spokesman confirms that the Tory whips are refusing to vote through “on the nod” Labour MPs in the palace (prob in ambulances) but too ill to get to the voting lobby in person.

Labour source confirms that a "handful" of Labour MPs are being rufused convention of being voted through "on the nod" as a result of their illness: "It's inhumane and shows how desperate they are. Trying to make it s as difficult for ill MPs as possible."

Source confirms that the Tory whips nodded the same ill MPs through for last week's votes and yesterday too. But have chosen not to today.

This is what Jeremy Hunt said in his opening statement about how the police and the Crown Prosecution Service would now consider whether there was a case for criminal charges. Hunt told MPs:

The police, working with the CPS and clinicians as necessary, will now carefully examine the new material in the report before determining their next steps and in particular whether criminal charges should now be brought.

In my own mind I am clear that any further action by the relevant criminal justice and health authorities must be thorough, transparent and independent of any organisation that may have an institutional vested interest in the outcome.

Back in the Commons Norman Lamb thanks Hunt for backing his judgment and setting up this inquiry. And he pays tribute to the bishop, James Jones, who was very good at building trust, he says.

Lamb says he is not as confident at Hunt is that the publication of the Baker report in 2003 would have made a big difference.

This is from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg.

Chief whip’s thumbs up in Commons a few minutes ago - rebellion off? pic.twitter.com/UrNkTBmC7u

Turning back to the EU withdrawal bill, my colleague Heather Stewart says that, after PMQs, Downing Street was not forthcoming about the reported compromise offer in the pipeline.

PM’s spokesman, asked about rumours of a last minute compromise on meaningful vote today: “The only amendment that the government has put down is the one it tabled on Thursday evening. That’s the one MPs will be voting on”.

Jeremy Corbyn’s spokesman confirms Tory whips refusing to “nod through” several ill Labour MPs, who are being expected to vote in person. Says it’s “unacceptable”.

Hunt is responding to Ashworth.

He says he agrees with everything Ashworth said.

Back in the Commons Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, says this is a shocking report.

He also pays tribute to Norman Lamb.

Turning back to the EU withdrawal bill, Sky’s Faisal Islam has this on the apparent government concession.

Written ministerial statement coming from Government that some in Parliament claim is a “*big* climbdown” after Tory rebels grew overnight - on amendability of meaningful vote resolution... we await the words.

John Bercow, the speaker, says some MPs whose constituents are affected by this case cannot speak because they are ministers.

Hunt says the government’s official response will be published later this year.

But he says some questions need to be answered.

Hunt says the report out today is “truly shocking”.

He says there was a catalogue of failings.

Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, is now making a statement about the findings of the Gospital hospital inquiry.

Here is our story about the inquiry’s report.

Related: Gosport hospital: more than 450 patients died due to opioid drugs policy

More than 450 patients died and possibly 200 more had their lives shortened because of a Hampshire hospital’s practice of giving opioid drugs without medical justification, a major inquiry has found.

The independent report found that Dr Jane Barton, the GP who ran wards at Gosport War Memorial hospital, routinely overprescribed drugs for her patients in the 1990s. Consultants were aware of her actions but did not intervene.

Labour’s Angela Eagle says May’s government is not increasing NHS spending as much as Labour did. Why should people be impressed by her pledge to increase spending by 3.4% a year when that is below the historic average?

May says Simon Stevens, the NHS England chief executive, has welcomed this. Unlike Labour’s money, this will go to improve patient care, she says.

Andrew Selous, a Conservative, asks May to ensure patients can always access a doctor on the NHS.

May says she wants all NHS patients to get access to the same services.

Ed Miliband, the former Labour leader, says he is glad May said Trump’s immigration policy was wrong. But May should do more. Can she stand up for our values where they are under threat across the world?

May says the government stands up for the fundamental values of democracy and human rights.

Norman Lamb, the former Lib Dem health minister, says the conclusions of the Gosport hospital inquiry, which he set up, are shocking. Does May agree there needs to be a new police inquiry?

May says the events at the hospital were “tragic” and “deeply troubling”. She says the public sector often closes ranks. She pays tribute to Lamb for setting up the inquiry. She is sorry it took the relatives so long to get an answer. This shows why the government is right to put so much focus on patient safety.

More on the EU withdrawal bill latest from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg.

1. Away from chamber sounds like govt going to publish a statement later on their understanding of a ‘neutral motion’ and whether it’s amendmable or not

2. Bear with me - we all danced right off head of the pin a long time ago but this might appease enough rebels to dilute the rebellion

Nigel Dodds, the DUP leader at Westminster, says Michel Barnier’s speech yesterday implied the EU would erect barriers after Brexit. It would be a boon for terrorists, he says.

May says the future security partnership she wants after Brexit would help both sides. She recognises the importance of the instruments involved.

Sir Mike Penning, a Conservative, welcomes yesterday’s decision to allow Alfie Dingley’s family to get cannabis oil.

May says the government has ordered a review. It wants to ensure this process does not take a long time.

A WMS to say the unamendable motion might in fact be amendable but only if the rebels don't amend the amendment today.

Joy. https://t.co/7HdFzPKRQE

Turning back to the EU withdrawal bill for a moment, this is from the Times’ Sam Coates.

Source: A compromise being discussed is gvt putting down a written ministerial statement “clarifying” the gvt motion on meaningful vote might be amendable to appease Tory remain rebels.

(I think this wd be a pretty meaningless sop since WMS can’t change Commons standing orders)

Labour’s Lisa Nandy says rail passengers in the north of England have had enough. She says she has seen emails from the Department for Transport saying officials were warned of chaos as long as two years ago. They describes some northern routes as meaningless, discuss how to handle MP and discuss propagating myths.

May says no government responds to leaked documents. She says the Department for Transport was reassured by an independent panel about the plans for the new timetable.

I've been handed emails showing that Ministers and DfT officials were warned about Northern rail chaos 2 years ago. They show utter contempt for Northern passengers. #PMQs

Bim Afolami, a Conservative, says he shares May’s strong commitment to the NHS. Can she assure him the money will lead to better patient outcomes?

May agrees. She does not want to see extra money going in and not being spend on patient care.

Here is May on the detention of child refugees in the US.

“This is wrong, this is not something we agree with, this is not the UK’s approach” @theresa_may on children in US detention centres#pmqs https://t.co/y3OmBWEJ5A pic.twitter.com/AHd1xBT6s3

PMQs - Snap verdict: That was by no means a classic, but it was one of those PMQs that could in retrospect turn out to be more significant than you might have thought while listening to the rather under-powered ding dong. That’s not because Corbyn won on health, a Labour issue where his emotive complaints about under-funding normally have force. In fact, this wasn’t so much a PMQs about health as about financial credibility - supposedly the Conservative party’s USP for most of its history - and Corbyn clearly had the best of the argument. His questions weren’t particularly flash, but they were were pertinent and reasonable, and May didn’t even begin to answer them. Where will all the money for the NHS come from? What taxes will go up? Will there be extra borrowing? These are proper questions (not loaded PMQs jibes, which the PM can ignore with some justification) and May’s perfectly articulate flannel could not really hide the fact that Corbyn had a point. He is outscoring May on fiscal prudence. The Tories ought to be worried ....

Corbyn says under Labour the NHS increase would be 5% this year. And what is her offer - a promise without saying where any of it would come from, apart from phantom taxes Hammond is presumably dreaming up now. But there is a human element to this. He quotes from a letter from someone saying her daughter needed a wheelchair but could not get one from the NHS. Does May think standing still is good enough for the NHS?

May says she is putting in extra money. She quotes what Simon Stevens, the NHS chief executive said. He said the settlement would provide the NHs with the money it needed. For every ?1 extra the government spends on the NHS in England, the Welsh Labour government spends just 84p.

Corbyn says May spoke about ?600m a week extra going to the NHS. That is over ?30bn a year - way more than the UK’s contributions. Her figures are so dodgy they belong on the side of a bus. Why is the PM pushing her own Mickey Mouse figures?

May says Corbyn should listen to what she said. He claimed that she promised that money by 2023-24. She said more money would be spent on the NHS as a result of her decision, partly funded by the UK no longer being in the EU. The government will be contributing a bit more. Hammond will bring forward plans before the spending review. If Corbyn is so concerned about tax, why did Labour oppose lifting the personal allowance.

Corbyn says he is pleased May is reading his speeches. He said EU money should be ringfenced for certain uses. He goes back to taxes. Last year May says firms could not plan on the basis of unspecified taxes. Which taxes are going up and for who?

May says Philip Hammond will set that out before the spending review. She says she is glad Labour has confirmed there will be money coming back from the EU.

Jeremy Corbyn pays tribute to his “friend”, the Finsbury Park imam.

He also pays tribute to the contribution of the Windrush generation, and he says he hopes May has put the “hostile environment” policy behind her.

Simon Hoare, the Tory MP for Dorset North, says Dorset is home to the Jurassic Coast, but is not home to dinosaurs. Will May confirm that the government will ban upskirting?

May says upskirting is a hideous invasion of privacy. The government will introduce a bill banning it. And the worst offenders will be added to the sex offenders’ list.

Labour’s Alan Whitehead says, after the UK signed up to agreements at the Paris climate change summit, will she sign up to new targets for 2050?

May says the government is committed to the Paris accord. The government remains committed to its targets, she says.

Theresa May says yesterday was the first anniversay of the Finsbury Park attack. Today the imam from the mosque is in the Commons, she says.

She says Friday is the 70th anniversary of the arrival of the Windrush. The government has announced an annual Windrush day to celebrate the diversity of the UK, she says.

This is from the Times’ Patrick Kidd.

Theresa May enters for PMQs with Boris Johnson. A last-minute chat about Trump in expectation of Corbyn going on our view of US immigration?

This is from the FT’s George Parker.

Brexit peace deal in the Commons? ERG Moggites and Grievey rebels appear to be gathering around an Oliver Letwin brokered compromise, pulling party back from the brink. Prob 1: waiting for @theresamay and @DavidDavisMP sign-off. Prob 2: will anyone understand it?

PMQs is about to start.

Some of the backbenchers who will be called to ask the PM a #PMQs on Wednesday 20 June.

Watch live on #bbcdp with @afneil @bbclaurak @Peter_Dowd @JackieDP @BBCTwo 1130-1300 pic.twitter.com/uPkhVtqQRj

Here is an extract from today’s Times story (pawyall) about the vote.

Tory whips are said to have “given up” persuading up to a dozen of their own MPs not to vote in favour of an amendment that would give parliament a decisive say on what happens in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Instead they are concentrating their efforts on encouraging Labour MPs in Leave-voting areas to defy their own whip and vote with the government.

If any Labour MPs are tempted by the idea that the Tories will "go easy" on them at the next election in return for support on today's vote, there are 49 Lib Dem ex-MPs that they really ought to talk to.

Guy Verhofstadt, the European parliament’s representative on Brexit, has been undertaking the first of two sessions at the Commons today – a marathon grilling by the Brexit select committee, which is still going on, almost two-and-half hours on.

Here’s a few things he has said so far. Asked by Tory MP John Whittingdale if Brexit would allow the EU to integrate more quickly without the UK as a drag, Verhofstadt said the process had been a failure for the block and could accelerate reform:

I look to the Brexit decision as a failure of the European union. If an important country like the UK is breaking away from the European Union, it’s difficult to say, oh, it’s a success, fantastic… It has opened our eyes in the European Union and it has has speeded up the whole thinking about reform.

I think it shall be necessary to use the whole transition period to detail this political declaration … To detail an agreement in which we will have close trade and economic relations, cooperation on internal security, cooperation on external security, and then a whole lot of diplomatic cooperation – for that we will need more time than three or four months. But that’s not a problem. That’s the reason why there’s a will from both sides to have a transition.

You have to make a difference in politics between hope and what is possible …. What is not possible is that you say, we are out of the European Union but we stay a member of Europol, we stay a member of the European arrest warrant, or even go further than you do today.

Today Britain has a number of opt-outs in these policies where you don’t participate. And now what the UK government is requesting is to participate in policies where in the past it has never opted. And then I say: Sorry, that is not possible. We need to find a practical arrangement.

The Commons has held two previous votes on the “meaningful vote” issue.

On Tuesday last week, as MPs were first voting on Lords amendments to the EU withdrawal bill, the government won a vote on this by voted by 324 votes to 298 - a majority of 26. But that was only because Theresa May had bought off Tory rebels at the last moment by promising them a compromise. (Dominic Grieve subsequently thought he had negotiated “Grieve 2” as the compromise - see 11.24am - but the government refused to accept it at the last minute after David Davis objected.)

Sam Gyimah, the universities minister, has made the Evening Standard splash by condemning President Trump’s decision to separate immigrant children from their parents.

Today’s ?@EveningStandard?: pressure grows on May and Boris to condemn Trump, as junior Minister leads way & Brexit rebellion latest + ?@MatthewdAncona? on cannabis + Serpentine Party glamour pic.twitter.com/umQO4DcLAG

Separating children from their parents in this way is beyond dreadful. This policy is indefensible, pure and simple! https://t.co/1Uev9imHj4

Procedural technicality alert. The government tabled the amendments to the EU withdrawal bill in such a way as to avoid a straight yes/no vote on the “meaningful vote” amendment passed by the House of Lords on Monday. That amendment was what Viscount Hailsham called “Grieve 2” - the amendment that Dominic Grieve thought he had agreed with the government last week, until it got nixed by David Davis, the Brexit secretary, at the last minute.

The text of that amendment (“Grieve 2”) is here (pdf).

Breaking: after last minute government procedural move to try to avoid a straight up and down vote on Grieve2 #MeaningfulVote. Dominic Grieve has tabled a manuscript Amdt which if selected will allow the Commons to have a straight vote on the #MeaningfulVote #UnderhandTactics pic.twitter.com/n16VU8ri1Z

Good morning. I’m Andrew Sparrow, taking over from Matthew Weaver. I was held up this morning for domestic reasons.

After PMQs Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, will be making a statement about the Gosport War Memorial hospital deaths. That mean that the debate on the EU withdrawal bill won’t start until about 2pm, with the vote coming at around 3.30pm.

One Government oral statement in the @HouseofCommons today:

Jeremy Hunt: Gosport Independent Panel – Publication of Report

Robert Buckland, the solicitor general, sounded confident that the government would win today. Talking to Sky’s All Out Politics Buckland he said:

I think our arguments are strong. I think we can persuade the Commons today. I must say the Lords have accepted all the arguments we’ve made. They have properly given back a matter that is for the Commons to decide. I very much hope that we can have finality on this issue today and then get on with the work that we need to do.

I’m optimistic about many things and I’m optimistic that today that our arguments are strong.

A note from the shadow Brexit secretary, Keir Starmer, to the Parliamentary Labour party, shows the lengths the leadership are going to stress it is not trying to stop Brexit.

The language is directed at the Brexit rebels to try to get them on side. It says the voe “isn’t about stopping Brexit... isn’t about delaying Brexit or tying the hands of negotiators... not about the future of Theresa May or of this government.”

Exc - here’s @Keir_Starmer’s note he sent round Labour MPs last night, language aimed squarely at Labour Brexit rebels - “isn’t about stopping Brexit... isn’t about delaying Brexit or tying the hands of negotiators... not about the future of Theresa May or of this government.” pic.twitter.com/JUE3px16Pt

Jeremy Corbyn is trying to persuade Labour Leavers to vote against the government.

Also worth noting that five Labour MPs - @KevinBarronMP @CarolineFlintMP @RogerGodsiff @FitzMP Denis Skinner - abstained last week. Sounds like Corbyn will have his work cut out.

ITV’s political editor Robert Peston reckons there is a real risk that May could a lose a vote that she could have avoided.

Writing on Facebook he says: “May could have swallowed the substance of the amendment and emerged unscathed.”

The real significance of today’s showdown is it’s a dress rehearsal for the biggie next month - the customs union amendment to the Trade Bill. Rebels are desperate to show they have the numbers to win that, PM desperate to show they don’t. (2/2)

It’s the rebel waverers that matter most this afternoon, not your Anna Soubrys or Ken Clarkes. And although both May and Corbyn say this is about the national interest, not party interest, it’s how their MPs interpret their conflicting loyalties that will swing the decision today.

Welcome to Politics live as Theresa May faces a knife-edge Commons vote on Brexit as MPs decide on parliament’s role in Britain’s exit from the European Union.

Tory rebels reckon they could inflict a defeat on the government as the EU withdrawal bill returns to the Commons after the Lords again backed giving MPs a “meaningful” say on the final deal.

Public Service announcement: Debate on the #MeaningfulVote is scheduled to last for 90 mins. Provided there are no Statements or UQs, the debate should start around 1pm with the key vote on whether to keep the #Grieve2 #MeaningfulVote Amdt as the first vote at around 2:30pm.

We were always going to get the normal dark arts of Westminster taking place, fully expected, but my understanding is that the position taken by a number of colleagues is solid, which is why the government is still in negotiations.

Potentially, yes. But ... this for me personally is a position of integrity, that I think Parliament deserves to have a proper role in this process, a truly meaningful vote.

Bloomin' Brexit - why it's so important to get it right: https://t.co/fifbAdbX5f #MeaningfulVote

Continue reading...
Wed, 20 Jun 2018 17:13:56 GMT
Ministers offer concession to try to avoid defeat on Brexit 'meaningful vote' - Politics livehttp://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/referendum/1261328-ministers-offer-concession-to-try-to-avoid-defeat-on-brexit-meaningful-vote-politics-live.html

Follow live updates for PMQs, health secretary statement and Theresa May’s final push to head off a ‘meaningful vote’ rebellion on Brexit

Labour’s Paul Farrelly raises a point of order. Referring to the Davis statement (see 1.53pm), he asks John Bercow what discretion he would have to rule that a motion could be amended if it were couched in neutral terms.

Bercow says he thinks this will be addressed in the debate.

Davis says you cannot enter a negotiation without the right to walk away.

So the Lords amendment would undermine the UK’s position in the negotiation, he says.

Sylvia Hermon, the independent MP for North Down, says she could not accept a no deal Brexit. That would lead to a hard border returning in Ireland.

Davis says the government will not accept the return of a hard border.

Davis is now talking about the “meaningful vote” amendment.

He says the government had three tests for such an amendment: it should not undermine the negotiations, it should not change the constitutional relationship between parliament and the executive, and it should accept the results of the referendum.

David Davis, the Brexit secretary, is opening the debate.

He says the government’s critics should not question its democratic credentials. He says parliament has been repeatedly involved in this process.

The debate is starting now.

John Bercow, the speaker, says he will call two amendments for a vote: Dominic Grieve’s one (see 11.24am) and one from the Lib Dem MP Tom Brake, saying the Commons “meaningful vote” could trigger another referendum on the final Brexit deal.

By lunchtime the gap between what the government was offering and what the rebels, led by Dominic Grieve, wanted was narrow. They both accept that, if MPs have not approved the Brexit withdrawal agreement by 21 January 2019, the government must schedule a vote within five working days. (See 11.24am.) But the government was saying that motion must be “in neutral terms, to the effect that the House of Commons has considered the matter of”. A motion like that would not be amendable. But Grieve and the rebels were not happy, because, in those circumstances, they wanted MPs to be able to table an amendment saying something like: “This House now requires the government to return to Brussels to try again/negotiate EEA membership/or whatever.”

The government has now issued a statement (see 1.53pm) saying that, actually, it will be up to the speaker at the time to decide if said motion debated under the terms of this clause can be amended.

1. Whether it is a climb down or a lawyer's way out - it massively reduces the chances of a rebellion later, and gives rebels and govt an escape route https://t.co/qWhewvX2DI

In the Commons Labour’s Ben Bradshaw has just asked a point of order about the Tories refusing to “nod through” sick MPs.

John Bercow, the speaker, says nodding through has been a long-established practice. But it is not matter for him.

This is from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssnberg.

Here’s the compromise or non-compromise pic.twitter.com/bLNJAJIZUM

John Prescott, the Labour former deputy prime minister, claims the government decision not to “nod through” sick MPs is unprecedented in his long experience.

In all my years in Parliament - even in the 1970s - I have NEVER seen this. This is absolutely bloody shameful.
I trust Labour MPs will be disgusted by these desperate and heartless Tory tactics, vote against the Government and back the meaningful vote. https://t.co/4OLNNUfttJ

Back to Gosport, and this is what the Crown Prosecution Service said following today’s report. A spokesman said”

We will consider the content of the report and will take any appropriate steps as required.

This is from Newsnight’s Nicholas Watt on the EU withdrawal bill.

Word last night was that compromise on meaningful vote would be: 1) Govt gesture: agree meaningful vote could be amendable. 2) Dominic Grieve gesture: that vote would have no legal force. 3) Compromise amendment would have to be tabled in lords. We’ll see

Back to the EU withdrawal bill, and more on Labour anger about the hardline approach of the Tory whips. These are from Sky’s Lewis Goodall.

Jeremy Corbyn spokesman confirms that the Tory whips are refusing to vote through “on the nod” Labour MPs in the palace (prob in ambulances) but too ill to get to the voting lobby in person.

Labour source confirms that a "handful" of Labour MPs are being rufused convention of being voted through "on the nod" as a result of their illness: "It's inhumane and shows how desperate they are. Trying to make it s as difficult for ill MPs as possible."

Source confirms that the Tory whips nodded the same ill MPs through for last week's votes and yesterday too. But have chosen not to today.

This is what Jeremy Hunt said in his opening statement about how the police and the Crown Prosecution Service would now consider whether there was a case for criminal charges. Hunt told MPs:

The police, working with the CPS and clinicians as necessary, will now carefully examine the new material in the report before determining their next steps and in particular whether criminal charges should now be brought.

In my own mind I am clear that any further action by the relevant criminal justice and health authorities must be thorough, transparent and independent of any organisation that may have an institutional vested interest in the outcome.

Back in the Commons Norman Lamb thanks Hunt for backing his judgment and setting up this inquiry. And he pays tribute to the bishop, James Jones, who was very good at building trust, he says.

Lamb says he is not as confident at Hunt is that the publication of the Baker report in 2003 would have made a big difference.

This is from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg.

Chief whip’s thumbs up in Commons a few minutes ago - rebellion off? pic.twitter.com/UrNkTBmC7u

Turning back to the EU withdrawal bill, my colleague Heather Stewart says that, after PMQs, Downing Street was not forthcoming about the reported compromise offer in the pipeline.

PM’s spokesman, asked about rumours of a last minute compromise on meaningful vote today: “The only amendment that the government has put down is the one it tabled on Thursday evening. That’s the one MPs will be voting on”.

Jeremy Corbyn’s spokesman confirms Tory whips refusing to “nod through” several ill Labour MPs, who are being expected to vote in person. Says it’s “unacceptable”.

Hunt is responding to Ashworth.

He says he agrees with everything Ashworth said.

Back in the Commons Jonathan Ashworth, the shadow health secretary, says this is a shocking report.

He also pays tribute to Norman Lamb.

Turning back to the EU withdrawal bill, Sky’s Faisal Islam has this on the apparent government concession.

Written ministerial statement coming from Government that some in Parliament claim is a “*big* climbdown” after Tory rebels grew overnight - on amendability of meaningful vote resolution... we await the words.

John Bercow, the speaker, says some MPs whose constituents are affected by this case cannot speak because they are ministers.

Hunt says the government’s official response will be published later this year.

But he says some questions need to be answered.

Hunt says the report out today is “truly shocking”.

He says there was a catalogue of failings.

Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, is now making a statement about the findings of the Gospital hospital inquiry.

Here is our story about the inquiry’s report.

Related: Gosport hospital: more than 450 patients died due to opioid drugs policy

More than 450 patients died and possibly 200 more had their lives shortened because of a Hampshire hospital’s practice of giving opioid drugs without medical justification, a major inquiry has found.

The independent report found that Dr Jane Barton, the GP who ran wards at Gosport War Memorial hospital, routinely overprescribed drugs for her patients in the 1990s. Consultants were aware of her actions but did not intervene.

Labour’s Angela Eagle says May’s government is not increasing NHS spending as much as Labour did. Why should people be impressed by her pledge to increase spending by 3.4% a year when that is below the historic average?

May says Simon Stevens, the NHS England chief executive, has welcomed this. Unlike Labour’s money, this will go to improve patient care, she says.

Andrew Selous, a Conservative, asks May to ensure patients can always access a doctor on the NHS.

May says she wants all NHS patients to get access to the same services.

Ed Miliband, the former Labour leader, says he is glad May said Trump’s immigration policy was wrong. But May should do more. Can she stand up for our values where they are under threat across the world?

May says the government stands up for the fundamental values of democracy and human rights.

Norman Lamb, the former Lib Dem health minister, says the conclusions of the Gosport hospital inquiry, which he set up, are shocking. Does May agree there needs to be a new police inquiry?

May says the events at the hospital were “tragic” and “deeply troubling”. She says the public sector often closes ranks. She pays tribute to Lamb for setting up the inquiry. She is sorry it took the relatives so long to get an answer. This shows why the government is right to put so much focus on patient safety.

More on the EU withdrawal bill latest from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg.

1. Away from chamber sounds like govt going to publish a statement later on their understanding of a ‘neutral motion’ and whether it’s amendmable or not

2. Bear with me - we all danced right off head of the pin a long time ago but this might appease enough rebels to dilute the rebellion

Nigel Dodds, the DUP leader at Westminster, says Michel Barnier’s speech yesterday implied the EU would erect barriers after Brexit. It would be a boon for terrorists, he says.

May says the future security partnership she wants after Brexit would help both sides. She recognises the importance of the instruments involved.

Sir Mike Penning, a Conservative, welcomes yesterday’s decision to allow Alfie Dingley’s family to get cannabis oil.

May says the government has ordered a review. It wants to ensure this process does not take a long time.

A WMS to say the unamendable motion might in fact be amendable but only if the rebels don't amend the amendment today.

Joy. https://t.co/7HdFzPKRQE

Turning back to the EU withdrawal bill for a moment, this is from the Times’ Sam Coates.

Source: A compromise being discussed is gvt putting down a written ministerial statement “clarifying” the gvt motion on meaningful vote might be amendable to appease Tory remain rebels.

(I think this wd be a pretty meaningless sop since WMS can’t change Commons standing orders)

Labour’s Lisa Nandy says rail passengers in the north of England have had enough. She says she has seen emails from the Department for Transport saying officials were warned of chaos as long as two years ago. They describes some northern routes as meaningless, discuss how to handle MP and discuss propagating myths.

May says no government responds to leaked documents. She says the Department for Transport was reassured by an independent panel about the plans for the new timetable.

I've been handed emails showing that Ministers and DfT officials were warned about Northern rail chaos 2 years ago. They show utter contempt for Northern passengers. #PMQs

Bim Afolami, a Conservative, says he shares May’s strong commitment to the NHS. Can she assure him the money will lead to better patient outcomes?

May agrees. She does not want to see extra money going in and not being spend on patient care.

Here is May on the detention of child refugees in the US.

“This is wrong, this is not something we agree with, this is not the UK’s approach” @theresa_may on children in US detention centres#pmqs https://t.co/y3OmBWEJ5A pic.twitter.com/AHd1xBT6s3

PMQs - Snap verdict: That was by no means a classic, but it was one of those PMQs that could in retrospect turn out to be more significant than you might have thought while listening to the rather under-powered ding dong. That’s not because Corbyn won on health, a Labour issue where his emotive complaints about under-funding normally have force. In fact, this wasn’t so much a PMQs about health as about financial credibility - supposedly the Conservative party’s USP for most of its history - and Corbyn clearly had the best of the argument. His questions weren’t particularly flash, but they were were pertinent and reasonable, and May didn’t even begin to answer them. Where will all the money for the NHS come from? What taxes will go up? Will there be extra borrowing? These are proper questions (not loaded PMQs jibes, which the PM can ignore with some justification) and May’s perfectly articulate flannel could not really hide the fact that Corbyn had a point. He is outscoring May on fiscal prudence. The Tories ought to be worried ....

Corbyn says under Labour the NHS increase would be 5% this year. And what is her offer - a promise without saying where any of it would come from, apart from phantom taxes Hammond is presumably dreaming up now. But there is a human element to this. He quotes from a letter from someone saying her daughter needed a wheelchair but could not get one from the NHS. Does May think standing still is good enough for the NHS?

May says she is putting in extra money. She quotes what Simon Stevens, the NHS chief executive said. He said the settlement would provide the NHs with the money it needed. For every ?1 extra the government spends on the NHS in England, the Welsh Labour government spends just 84p.

Corbyn says May spoke about ?600m a week extra going to the NHS. That is over ?30bn a year - way more than the UK’s contributions. Her figures are so dodgy they belong on the side of a bus. Why is the PM pushing her own Mickey Mouse figures?

May says Corbyn should listen to what she said. He claimed that she promised that money by 2023-24. She said more money would be spent on the NHS as a result of her decision, partly funded by the UK no longer being in the EU. The government will be contributing a bit more. Hammond will bring forward plans before the spending review. If Corbyn is so concerned about tax, why did Labour oppose lifting the personal allowance.

Corbyn says he is pleased May is reading his speeches. He said EU money should be ringfenced for certain uses. He goes back to taxes. Last year May says firms could not plan on the basis of unspecified taxes. Which taxes are going up and for who?

May says Philip Hammond will set that out before the spending review. She says she is glad Labour has confirmed there will be money coming back from the EU.

Jeremy Corbyn pays tribute to his “friend”, the Finsbury Park imam.

He also pays tribute to the contribution of the Windrush generation, and he says he hopes May has put the “hostile environment” policy behind her.

Simon Hoare, the Tory MP for Dorset North, says Dorset is home to the Jurassic Coast, but is not home to dinosaurs. Will May confirm that the government will ban upskirting?

May says upskirting is a hideous invasion of privacy. The government will introduce a bill banning it. And the worst offenders will be added to the sex offenders’ list.

Labour’s Alan Whitehead says, after the UK signed up to agreements at the Paris climate change summit, will she sign up to new targets for 2050?

May says the government is committed to the Paris accord. The government remains committed to its targets, she says.

Theresa May says yesterday was the first anniversay of the Finsbury Park attack. Today the imam from the mosque is in the Commons, she says.

She says Friday is the 70th anniversary of the arrival of the Windrush. The government has announced an annual Windrush day to celebrate the diversity of the UK, she says.

This is from the Times’ Patrick Kidd.

Theresa May enters for PMQs with Boris Johnson. A last-minute chat about Trump in expectation of Corbyn going on our view of US immigration?

This is from the FT’s George Parker.

Brexit peace deal in the Commons? ERG Moggites and Grievey rebels appear to be gathering around an Oliver Letwin brokered compromise, pulling party back from the brink. Prob 1: waiting for @theresamay and @DavidDavisMP sign-off. Prob 2: will anyone understand it?

PMQs is about to start.

Some of the backbenchers who will be called to ask the PM a #PMQs on Wednesday 20 June.

Watch live on #bbcdp with @afneil @bbclaurak @Peter_Dowd @JackieDP @BBCTwo 1130-1300 pic.twitter.com/uPkhVtqQRj

Here is an extract from today’s Times story (pawyall) about the vote.

Tory whips are said to have “given up” persuading up to a dozen of their own MPs not to vote in favour of an amendment that would give parliament a decisive say on what happens in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Instead they are concentrating their efforts on encouraging Labour MPs in Leave-voting areas to defy their own whip and vote with the government.

If any Labour MPs are tempted by the idea that the Tories will "go easy" on them at the next election in return for support on today's vote, there are 49 Lib Dem ex-MPs that they really ought to talk to.

Guy Verhofstadt, the European parliament’s representative on Brexit, has been undertaking the first of two sessions at the Commons today – a marathon grilling by the Brexit select committee, which is still going on, almost two-and-half hours on.

Here’s a few things he has said so far. Asked by Tory MP John Whittingdale if Brexit would allow the EU to integrate more quickly without the UK as a drag, Verhofstadt said the process had been a failure for the block and could accelerate reform:

I look to the Brexit decision as a failure of the European union. If an important country like the UK is breaking away from the European Union, it’s difficult to say, oh, it’s a success, fantastic… It has opened our eyes in the European Union and it has has speeded up the whole thinking about reform.

I think it shall be necessary to use the whole transition period to detail this political declaration … To detail an agreement in which we will have close trade and economic relations, cooperation on internal security, cooperation on external security, and then a whole lot of diplomatic cooperation – for that we will need more time than three or four months. But that’s not a problem. That’s the reason why there’s a will from both sides to have a transition.

You have to make a difference in politics between hope and what is possible …. What is not possible is that you say, we are out of the European Union but we stay a member of Europol, we stay a member of the European arrest warrant, or even go further than you do today.

Today Britain has a number of opt-outs in these policies where you don’t participate. And now what the UK government is requesting is to participate in policies where in the past it has never opted. And then I say: Sorry, that is not possible. We need to find a practical arrangement.

The Commons has held two previous votes on the “meaningful vote” issue.

On Tuesday last week, as MPs were first voting on Lords amendments to the EU withdrawal bill, the government won a vote on this by voted by 324 votes to 298 - a majority of 26. But that was only because Theresa May had bought off Tory rebels at the last moment by promising them a compromise. (Dominic Grieve subsequently thought he had negotiated “Grieve 2” as the compromise - see 11.24am - but the government refused to accept it at the last minute after David Davis objected.)

Sam Gyimah, the universities minister, has made the Evening Standard splash by condemning President Trump’s decision to separate immigrant children from their parents.

Today’s ?@EveningStandard?: pressure grows on May and Boris to condemn Trump, as junior Minister leads way & Brexit rebellion latest + ?@MatthewdAncona? on cannabis + Serpentine Party glamour pic.twitter.com/umQO4DcLAG

Separating children from their parents in this way is beyond dreadful. This policy is indefensible, pure and simple! https://t.co/1Uev9imHj4

Procedural technicality alert. The government tabled the amendments to the EU withdrawal bill in such a way as to avoid a straight yes/no vote on the “meaningful vote” amendment passed by the House of Lords on Monday. That amendment was what Viscount Hailsham called “Grieve 2” - the amendment that Dominic Grieve thought he had agreed with the government last week, until it got nixed by David Davis, the Brexit secretary, at the last minute.

The text of that amendment (“Grieve 2”) is here (pdf).

Breaking: after last minute government procedural move to try to avoid a straight up and down vote on Grieve2 #MeaningfulVote. Dominic Grieve has tabled a manuscript Amdt which if selected will allow the Commons to have a straight vote on the #MeaningfulVote #UnderhandTactics pic.twitter.com/n16VU8ri1Z

Good morning. I’m Andrew Sparrow, taking over from Matthew Weaver. I was held up this morning for domestic reasons.

After PMQs Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, will be making a statement about the Gosport War Memorial hospital deaths. That mean that the debate on the EU withdrawal bill won’t start until about 2pm, with the vote coming at around 3.30pm.

One Government oral statement in the @HouseofCommons today:

Jeremy Hunt: Gosport Independent Panel – Publication of Report

Robert Buckland, the solicitor general, sounded confident that the government would win today. Talking to Sky’s All Out Politics Buckland he said:

I think our arguments are strong. I think we can persuade the Commons today. I must say the Lords have accepted all the arguments we’ve made. They have properly given back a matter that is for the Commons to decide. I very much hope that we can have finality on this issue today and then get on with the work that we need to do.

I’m optimistic about many things and I’m optimistic that today that our arguments are strong.

A note from the shadow Brexit secretary, Keir Starmer, to the Parliamentary Labour party, shows the lengths the leadership are going to stress it is not trying to stop Brexit.

The language is directed at the Brexit rebels to try to get them on side. It says the voe “isn’t about stopping Brexit... isn’t about delaying Brexit or tying the hands of negotiators... not about the future of Theresa May or of this government.”

Exc - here’s @Keir_Starmer’s note he sent round Labour MPs last night, language aimed squarely at Labour Brexit rebels - “isn’t about stopping Brexit... isn’t about delaying Brexit or tying the hands of negotiators... not about the future of Theresa May or of this government.” pic.twitter.com/JUE3px16Pt

Jeremy Corbyn is trying to persuade Labour Leavers to vote against the government.

Also worth noting that five Labour MPs - @KevinBarronMP @CarolineFlintMP @RogerGodsiff @FitzMP Denis Skinner - abstained last week. Sounds like Corbyn will have his work cut out.

ITV’s political editor Robert Peston reckons there is a real risk that May could a lose a vote that she could have avoided.

Writing on Facebook he says: “May could have swallowed the substance of the amendment and emerged unscathed.”

The real significance of today’s showdown is it’s a dress rehearsal for the biggie next month - the customs union amendment to the Trade Bill. Rebels are desperate to show they have the numbers to win that, PM desperate to show they don’t. (2/2)

It’s the rebel waverers that matter most this afternoon, not your Anna Soubrys or Ken Clarkes. And although both May and Corbyn say this is about the national interest, not party interest, it’s how their MPs interpret their conflicting loyalties that will swing the decision today.

Welcome to Politics live as Theresa May faces a knife-edge Commons vote on Brexit as MPs decide on parliament’s role in Britain’s exit from the European Union.

Tory rebels reckon they could inflict a defeat on the government as the EU withdrawal bill returns to the Commons after the Lords again backed giving MPs a “meaningful” say on the final deal.

Public Service announcement: Debate on the #MeaningfulVote is scheduled to last for 90 mins. Provided there are no Statements or UQs, the debate should start around 1pm with the key vote on whether to keep the #Grieve2 #MeaningfulVote Amdt as the first vote at around 2:30pm.

We were always going to get the normal dark arts of Westminster taking place, fully expected, but my understanding is that the position taken by a number of colleagues is solid, which is why the government is still in negotiations.

Potentially, yes. But ... this for me personally is a position of integrity, that I think Parliament deserves to have a proper role in this process, a truly meaningful vote.

Bloomin' Brexit - why it's so important to get it right: https://t.co/fifbAdbX5f #MeaningfulVote

Continue reading...
Wed, 20 Jun 2018 13:34:04 GMT
Top Catalan chef Joan Roca defends decision to host Spanish kinghttp://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/referendum/1261330-top-catalan-chef-joan-roca-defends-decision-to-host-spanish-king.html

Roca dismisses suggestion he is taking sides in Catalan independence row

The celebrated Catalan chef Joan Roca has dismissed suggestions that he is taking sides in the bitter battle over Catalonia’s independence by hiring out one of his venues for a prize-giving ceremony attended by King Felipe.

Roca, whose three-Michelin starred restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, has twice been named the best in the world, says he is being unfairly criticised for agreeing to host the Spanish monarch, who angered many Catalans by refusing to denounce the police violence that met last year’s illegal independence referendum.

Continue reading...
Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:58:13 GMT
Převrat v Makedonii? Premiér hrozí prezidentovi sesazením, nepodepíše-li dohoduhttp://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/referendum/1261223-prevrat-v-makedonii-premier-hrozi-prezidentovi-sesazenim-nepodepise-li-dohodu.html Skopje - Na politické scéně v Makedonii se vyostřuje spor o dohodu s Řeckem. Premiér Zoran Zaev pohrozil prezidentovi Ďorgemu Ivanovovi sesazením, pokud odmítne dokument podepsat dohodu, přestože by ho schválili občané v referendu. Dohodu dnes ratifikoval parlament. Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:54:00 GMT František Kuba: Patří ČSSD do vlády nebo na smetiště dějin? Dostaví se sebevznícení?http://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/referendum/1261416-frantisek-kuba-patr-%23237%3B-cssd-do-vl-%23225%3Bdy-nebo-na-smetiste-dejin-dostav-%23237%3B-se-sebevzn-%23237%3Bcen-%23237%3B-.html Posledního května letošního roku vyšel na úvodní straně Práva článek s nadpisem Pro vládu s ANO zatím většina. Ale větší výpovědní hodnotu má v článku Karoliny Brodníčkové nad/nadpis „Prozatímní výsledky referenda soc. dem.“ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:32:00 GMT Miroslav Poche v 10 bodech: Kdo je politik ČSSD, proč ho Zeman a komunisté odmítají a co má za sebouhttp://aktualne.prahanadlani.cz/referendum/1261394-miroslav-poche-v-10-bodech-kdo-je-politik-cssd-proc-ho-zeman-a-komuniste-odmitaji-a-co-ma-za-sebou.html ČSSD ve vnitrostranickém referendu schválila vstup do koalice s ANO za podpory KSČM. Do vznikající vlády ale hodil vidle prezident Zeman a komunisté. Odmítají kandidaturu sociálního demokrata Miroslava Pocheho na post ministra zahraničí. Proč? Kdo je Miroslav Poche, jakou politickou kariéru má za sebou a co je podstatou kontroverzní kauzy, které se účastnil? Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:00:00 GMT